News

(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 13:40:48 -0400)


“Look, I’ve called many people. And I would think that every one of them appreciated it,” Trump told Maria Bartiromo in an interview on Fox News on Sunday.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:41:49 -0400)


Chinese president Xi Jinping declared an era of national rejuvenation in a speech that garnered 1.5 billion virtual claps on a virtual applause app released in conjunction with the Communist Party congress.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:14:24 -0400)


A string of murders in Florida is sparking fears that a serial killer is targeting Tampa residents.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 17:04:07 -0400)


First lady Melania Trump gave a group of students a special treat on Monday during her surprise visit to a Michigan middle school.


(Tue, 24 Oct 2017 00:02:48 -0400)


Bill O’Reilly says he’s made at God over the sexual harassment allegations that drove him off the air at Fox News earlier this year.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:58:35 -0400)


Indonesia's government is seeking clarification from the U.S. after the Indonesian military chief was denied entry to the country, an official said Sunday.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 14:05:43 -0400)


Conjoined twins born in Gaza Sunday need to leave the blockaded Palestinian enclave for treatment crucial to their survival, their doctor and a family member said. "A woman gave birth this morning to Siamese twins joined at the stomach and pelvis," Allam Abu Hamda, head of the neonatal unit at Gaza's Shifa Hospital, told AFP. The twins, whose condition Abu Hamda said was stable, have one shared leg, but separate hearts and lungs.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 21:14:50 -0400)


It's a situation no ocean swimmer wants to find themselves in. John Craig was free diving off the coast of Shark Bay in Western Australia on Friday afternoon, when he suddenly found himself alone — and stalked by a tiger shark. SEE ALSO: In Australia, sometimes you've got to pick a shark out of a pool Craig and a friend of his were at the last dive spot of the day, where a series of unfortunate events began, according to his Facebook post.  On his first shot spearfishing, he had managed to get his spear stuck in a rock. Meanwhile, his friend was on the boat, which was having mechanical trouble. By the point Craig managed to get his spear free, the boat had drifted away. He was alone. "I started to call out and splash to try and get the attention of my friend but after five minutes it was clear I was on my own ... I had been splashing and screaming for some time and my heart rate was sky high," he wrote in the post. Craig then dived underwater to check that he was in the same place as marked on the GPS, when he noticed a four-metre-long tiger shark approaching and circling beneath him.  "It was obvious the sharks had been attracted by my splashing and panicking so I knew immediately that I had to try to calm down in order to survive," he said. After recognising the shark was trying to size him up, Craig decided to make a beeline for the shore. It wasn't going to be an easy swim, he was 7.4 kilometres (4.6 miles) out to sea. Then, the shark followed him. "I have to admit that at this point I thought I was gone," he said. Fortunately, the shark swimming along with him gave up after about 500 metres in, and left him alone.  Craig kept swimming for about three hours before he noticed boats and a plane searching for him. He screamed and waved at them — but his wetsuit was in camouflage, making it difficult for rescuers to find him. He made it to shore, exhausted from the swim and barely able to walk. The rescue boats and plane were too far for him to signal. Half an hour later, a plane came along the coast and circled to show that it had seen him. He was picked up by a fisheries boat, and reunited with his wife. "I feel extremely lucky to be alive and was blown away by the Shark Bay community's efforts to rescue me," he added. "I am eternally grateful and I'm sure I'll be buying beers for years to come."  Despite the frightening experience, Craig doesn't want to discourage people from diving around Shark Bay. "We need them in the oceans and as much as it was scary at the time I can only reflect on how beautiful that big female tiger shark was. If the circumstances were different I would have been stoked to have that experience," he said. WATCH: Someone created a storm lamp that produces lightning every time Trump tweets


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:43:20 -0400)


Every year, New Yorkers and their beloved canine pals embark on a time-honored tradition: The Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:24:52 -0400)


All five living former U.S. presidents gathered at a hurricane relief concert in Texas to raise money for victims of Hurricane Harvey, Irma, and Maria on Saturday night -- and the Internet can't stop obsessing about one moment between George W. Bush and Barack Obama.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 19:25:11 -0400)


The Carrera T is yet another 911 variant, but this is now the lightest 911 you can buy.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 20:22:01 -0400)


(Reuters) - The trial of a Mexican man accused of murdering a woman while illegally in the United States began in San Francisco on Monday, a case that President Donald Trump has cited as an example of the dangers posed by lax border security. Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, also known as Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, has said he shot Kate Steinle by accident on a pier in the California city on July 1, 2015. "He did not know the object in his hand was a gun," Matt Gonzalez, an attorney for the defendant, was quoted as saying by NBC Bay Area before he headed into the courtroom.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 15:20:52 -0400)


was right to call former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon a white supremacist, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) contended on Sunday.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 21:20:09 -0400)


On the heels of devastating wildfires that killed more than 40 people in Northern California earlier this month, Southern California is now on high alert for fire danger.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 20:35:36 -0400)


A woman and her two children have been arrested in Long Island in connection to seven armed robberies, all of which took place over the last month.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:52:27 -0400)


In a tradition that may go back centuries, older students at St Andrews spend a weekend showing new kids around, after which the younger students demonstrate their gratitude with a gift. It used to be raisins, but not now.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:31:47 -0400)


It affects more than 30 products


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:23:46 -0400)


A 13-year-old boy fatally shot a 10-year-old friend with a crossbow and wounded the victim’s younger brother as the boys played in a neighborhood treehouse in Oklahoma on Saturday evening, law enforcement officials said.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:00:22 -0400)


When Haider al-Abadi was tasked with forming a new Iraqi government in August 2014, just weeks after a lightning offensive by the Islamic State group, many believed he would fail. Three years later, the stocky prime minister with a close-cut white beard has transformed what many in Iraq considered "mission impossible" into a success story. "The standard view of Abadi was that he was indecisive, weak and bit too conciliatory for Iraqi politics," says Fanar Haddad, a research fellow at the Middle East Institute of the National University of Singapore.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:01:17 -0400)


The female spy used a fake identity to get a job with a major Democratic donor and posed as an accountant.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:52:14 -0400)


The ethics watchdog for Norway's $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund is reviewing allegations that U.S. pipeline operator Energy Transfer Partners may breach the fund's investment guidelines. Under rules set by Norway's parliament, any firm the fund invests in must meet guidelines related to the environment, human rights, governance and other issues. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe has said it could contaminate the Missouri River and said it threatens their sacred sites.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:23:35 -0400)


WASHINGTON ― Office of Management and Budget chief Mick Mulvaney suggested on Fox News Sunday that President Donald Trump could back a bipartisan deal on making certain reimbursement payments to insurers if he also got other, smaller changes to the health care system.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 18:50:22 -0400)


Some Northern Californians who feared the worst for their pets in the wake of this month’s deadly wildfires are getting some welcome good news in recent days: Their animals survived.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 15:44:03 -0400)


Police are looking for the public's help to identify a young boy whose lifeless body washed ashore on a beach in Galveston, Texas, on Friday evening.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 09:57:52 -0400)


A British man has been sentenced to three months in prison in Dubai for touching a man's hip in a bar, according to campaigners. Jamie Harron, from Stirling, was arrested in July over the incident in which he said he put his hand on a man's hip to avoid spilling a drink in a crowded bar. The 27-year-old electrician had been working in Afghanistan and was on a two-day stopover in the United Arab Emirates at the time. After his arrest for public indecency he lost his job and was told he could have faced up to three years in jail. Campaign group Detained in Dubai (DiD) said he was sentenced to three months imprisonment at court on Sunday but lawyers plan to appeal. The group said Mr Harron is "angry, disappointed, and dreads what may happen next". He is not currently in custody while the appeal is considered, DiD chief executive Radha Stirling said. Mr Harron has already been sentenced in absentia to 30 days in prison for failing to appear at a court hearing for making a rude gesture and drinking alcohol during the same July incident. Unusual laws that tourists should be wary of DiD said the 27-year-old was not told about the court date in advance and that sentence is also being appealed against. In relation to the alleged public indecency charge, Mr Harron is said to have been holding a drink, moving through a crowded bar and held a hand in front of him to avoid spilling it on himself or others. He then "touched a man on his hip to avoid impact". He was initially jailed for five days and then released on bail with his passport confiscated. Ms Stirling said: "Now Jamie has been sentenced to three months; there is no telling whether a judgement on appeal will be better or worse. "He has already suffered tremendously as a result of these allegations, and now faces the likelihood of incarceration. "His family was unable to visit him during this critical time because they faced a very real risk of imprisonment themselves under the UAE's cyber crime laws which forbid criticism of the government. "At this point, Jamie will definitely be pursuing civil action against his accusers when he does eventually return home, as it appears that he will not be able to find justice in the UAE." She added: "He feels betrayed and exploited by the system, which did not investigate the reports of key witnesses in his defence and led him to believe that the case would be dropped." A spokeswoman for the Foreign Office said: "We have been in contact with a British man following his arrest in Dubai in July. We are providing consular assistance."


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:58:21 -0400)


A prominent journalist at Russia’s top independent radio station was stabbed in the neck on Monday after a spate of recent attacks and threats against Russian media.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:24:00 -0400)


Wearing a white T-shirt emblazoned with swastikas, Randy Furniss, hands in his pockets, walked slowly through a crowd Thursday that had largely gathered to protest white nationalist Richard Spencer, who was delivering a speech at the University of Florida. Days before Florida Gov. Rick Scott, R, had warned in an executive order that a "threat of a potential emergency is imminent" in Alachua County, where the University of Florida is located, noting that prior speaking engagements involving Spencer have sparked protest and violence. The event was Spencer's first public speech on a college campus since he led hundreds of torch-bearing white supremacists, white nationalists and others through the University of Virginia in a far-right rally in August that preceded a weekend of violent protests in Charlottesville.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:28:16 -0400)


Catalan separatists Monday threatened "mass civil disobedience" if Madrid carries out threats to depose their leaders, as tensions mounted over a bid to sever the region from Spain. Madrid stood firm on its plans to replace the government of the semi-autonomous region whose inhabitants voted "Yes" in a banned independence referendum on October 1. Catalonia's separatist parties, in turn, called a special session of the regional parliament for Thursday to devise a response.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 15:28:33 -0400)


The recalled produce included salad mixes and broccoli medleys from the brands Mann's and Kohlrabi.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 17:10:48 -0400)


By Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Firearms-related deaths and injuries increased 70 percent in parts of California in the weeks after gun shows in neighboring Nevada, which has fewer regulations on such events, a University of California, Berkeley study released on Monday found. The research could help prevent gun deaths by charting a pattern between where weapons are purchased at gun shows and where shootings take place, according to the authors. The study, which was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health, examined firearm injury rates before and after California and Nevada gun shows between 2005 and 2013 in areas of California near the shows.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 13:17:26 -0400)


ABC News' Chief Global Correspondent Martha Raddatz travelled to the USS Reagan for an exclusive look at U.S. military preparations near North Korea.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:23:07 -0400)



(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:11:31 -0400)


The widow of a U.S. soldier killed in Niger confirmed a congresswoman’s account about her phone call with President Donald Trump, which ignited a political firestorm.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 01:08:19 -0400)


The families of a young couple found dead in an embrace believe they died in a murder-suicide motivated by compassion.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:16:10 -0400)


Talk about a bum note: A Montreal man says he’s facing a $117 traffic ticket just for singing in his car.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 04:49:00 -0400)


The United States is preparing to put nuclear bomber planes on 24-hour alert for the first time since the Cold War, a senior Air Force official has said. A fleet of B-52s laden with nuclear weapons could soon be readied to launch within a day's notice amid growing tensions with North Korea. General David Goldfein, Air Force Chief of Staff, said US military leaders were being forced to adapt to "the reality of the global situation we find ourselves in".


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 15:23:52 -0400)


Germany on Monday signed a deal to sell three submarines to the Israeli navy in an agreement of "strategic importance" to the Jewish state, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said. Netanyahu "welcomed the signing of a memorandum of understanding between Germany and the state of Israel to acquire the submarines," his office said in a Hebrew-language statement.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 12:55:47 -0400)


The dramatic weight loss of a severely chunky golden retriever mix could be an inspiration to people caring for overweight pets.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:51:53 -0400)


Another month, another onslaught of new additions -- and titles being taken away -- on Netflix.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:06:08 -0400)


Take a careful look at the image of two brains on this page. The picture is of the brains of two three-year-old children. It’s obvious that the brain on the left is much bigger than the one on the right. The image on the left also has fewer spots, and far fewer dark “fuzzy” areas. To neurologists who study the brain, and who have worked out how to interpret the images, the difference between these two brains is both remarkable and shocking. The brain on the right lacks some of the most fundamental areas present in the image on the left. Those deficits make it impossible for that child to develop capacities that the child on the left will have: the child on the right will grow into an adult who is less intelligent, less able to empathise with others, more likely to become addicted to drugs and involved in violent crime than the child on the left. The child on the right is much more likely to be unemployed and to be dependent on welfare, and to develop mental and other serious health problems. What could possibly cause so radical a divergence in brain development? The obvious answer is that it must have been some illness or terrible accident. The obvious answer is wrong. he primary cause of the extraordinary difference between the brains of these two three-year-old children is the way they were treated by their mothers. The child with the much more fully developed brain was cherished by its mother, who was constantly and fully responsive to her baby. The child with the shrivelled brain was neglected and abused. That difference in treatment explains why one child’s brain develops fully, and the other’s does not. Neurologists are beginning to understand exactly how a baby’s interaction with their mother determines how, and indeed whether, the brain grows in the way that it should. Professor Allan Schore, of UCLA, who has surveyed the scientific literature and has made significant contributions to it, stresses that the growth of brain cells is a “consequence of an infant’s interaction with the main caregiver [usually the mother]”. The growth of the baby’s brain “literally requires positive interaction between mother and infant. The development of cerebral circuits depends on it.” Prof Schore points out that if a baby is not treated properly in the first two years of life, the genes for various aspects of brain function, including intelligence, cannot operate, and may not even come into existence. Nature and nurture cannot be disentangled: the genes a baby has will be profoundly affected by the way it is treated. The details of how the chemical reactions that are essential to the formation of new brain cells and the connections between them are affected by the way a mother interacts with her baby are extremely technical. Suffice it to say that there is now a very substantial body of evidence that shows that the way a baby is treated in the first two years determines whether or not the resulting adult has a fully functioning brain. The damage caused by neglect and other forms of abuse comes by degrees: the more severe the neglect, the greater the damage. Eighty per cent of brain cells that a person will ever have are manufactured during the first two years after birth. If the process of building brain cells and connections between them goes wrong, the deficits are permanent. This discovery has enormous implications for social policy. It explains two very persistent features of our society. One is the way that chronic disadvantage reproduces itself across generations of the same families. There is a cycle of deprivation – lack of educational attainment, persistent unemployment, poverty, addiction, crime – which, once a family is in it, has proved almost impossible to break. The way that the development of a child’s brain is dependent on the way that the child is treated by its mother explains why this depressing cycle happens. Parents who, because their parents neglected them, do not have fully developed brains, neglect their own children in a similar way: their own children’s brains suffer from the same lack of development that blighted their own lives. They, too, are likely to fail at school, to be liable to get addicted to drugs, to be unable to hold down a job, and to have a propensity to violence. The second persistent feature is the dismal failure of rehabilitation programmes that aim to diminish the rate at which persistent young offenders commit crimes. Many different approaches have been tried, from intensive supervision to taking young offenders on safaris, but none has worked reliably or effectively. Recent research indicates that a large majority – perhaps more than three quarters – of persistent young offenders have brains that have not developed properly. They have, that is, suffered from neglect in the first two years of life, which prevented their brains from growing. As a consequence, they may be incapable of responding to the same incentives and punishments that will steer those with more fully developed brains away from crime. That result may lead you to conclude that nothing can be done about the social problems that result from childhood neglect. But that would be wrong. There is a way to break the cycle, and it is not terribly difficult to achieve. It consists in intervening early and showing mothers who neglect their children how to treat them in a way which will lead their babies’ brains to develop fully. “Early intervention”, as the policy is called, has been tried in parts of the US for more than 15 years. It consists in ensuring that mothers identified as “at risk” of neglecting their babies are given regular visits (at least once every week) by a nurse who instructs them on how to care for the newborn child. Data from the city of Elmira in New York State, where such programmes have been in place longest, show that children whose mothers had received those visits did much better than children from a comparable background whose mothers were not part of the programme: they had, for instance, 50 per cent fewer arrests, 80 per cent fewer convictions, and a significantly lower rate of drug abuse. Graham Allen, the Labour MP for Nottingham North, has been a fervent advocate of introducing early intervention programmes into the UK since at least 2008. That year, he collaborated with Iain Duncan Smith, now Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, on Early Intervention: Good Parents, Great Kids, Better Citizens, a report for the Centre for Social Justice which set out evidence that the neglect of children in the first two years of life damages the development of their brains. The report also looked at the social problems that resulted, and examined the effects that early intervention could have in helping to solve those problems. Mr Allen’s own constituency is one of the most deprived in England: it has the highest rates of teenage pregnancy in Europe, and one of the lowest rates of participation in higher education. “There is no doubt that early intervention can make a tremendous contribution to improving our society,” Mr Allen says. “Not the least benefit is the financial one. The amount it saves taxpayers, by reducing benefits, by cutting care home places for kids who would otherwise have to be taken from their parents, by reducing prison places, and so on, is staggering.” Andrea Leadsom, the Conservative MP for South Northamptonshire, agrees. She is a passionate advocate of early intervention programmes. “I know they work because I have seen them in operation”, she says. “I helped to run an early intervention centre in Oxford, one of the first early intervention programmes in England. I have helped to institute such programmes in Northamptonshire. I can bear witness to the astonishing benefits. "The biggest problem at the moment is that the programmes are far too small. In Oxford, the centre sees perhaps 300 babies a year. But there are 17,000 babies born in Oxford every year, which means there are 34,000 babies in Oxford in the first two years of life who might benefit from the programme. "We need central Government to get behind early intervention so that it happens on a big enough scale everywhere.” Frank Field, the Labour MP for Birkenhead, is another passionate advocate of early intervention. He has also introduced small-scale schemes in his own constituency, and is working hard to find ways to get such schemes adopted more widely. There is a remarkable cross-party consensus that early intervention is a vitally important policy which needs to be supported nationally. Both David Cameron and Ed Miliband have endorsed early intervention, and insisted that it should be implemented. But nothing is happening to make sure that it is. “Quite the opposite,” notes Mr Allen. “The funding I thought was earmarked for it is being taken away. The plans that I have put forward are being hollowed out.” “It’s crazy,” adds Mrs Leadsom. “This is a policy that has the potential to transform our society, to mean that the next generation of babies will grow into more responsible, less crime-prone, and better educated adults. "We know what needs to be done to get those results: we need to ensure that mothers who are at risk of neglecting or abusing their babies in the first two years of life are instructed how to care for them and interact with them properly. But no one in central government is pushing it. In fact, they’re taking away the early intervention grant in order to pay for the pupil premium for two-year-olds.” Frank Field is just as depressed about the prospects of getting early intervention adopted by the Government. “The Prime Minister asked me to write a report on early intervention,” he says. “My hopes were up when I delivered it several weeks ago. But as far as I can tell, he hasn’t even read it.” What explains the failure to adopt early intervention programmes nationally? The greatest obstacle may simply be that the biggest benefits will not be obvious for 15 years. The babies who benefit from early intervention today will take more than a decade to grow into teenagers who do not commit the crimes they would have perpetrated had their mothers not been helped by an early intervention programme. Elections, however, are every five years. That means the benefits will not accrue to the politicians in power now, but to their successors – which could be why those in power now are reluctant to expend effort and money on early intervention programmes. “I hope that isn’t true,” says Graham Allen. “Because if it is, it would mean we are politically incapable of implementing the one policy that will certainly make our society immeasurably better. And what more profound condemnation of our political system could there be than that?”


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 20:20:03 -0400)


TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Police escorted children to school Monday and a city bus changed up its usual route as a neighborhood near downtown Tampa feared a serial killer may be on the loose.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:14:16 -0400)


Police are working to identify a young boy whose lifeless body was found Friday evening after washing ashore on a quiet stretch of beach in Galveston, Texas


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 02:32:55 -0400)


blasted Steve Bannon in an interview on “Fox News Sunday,” saying the former White House chief strategist backs losing Republican candidates who are dividing and hurting the party.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:00:48 -0400)


Procrastinating husband, wives, boyfriends and girlfriends: fear not!


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:43:00 -0400)


A British businessman and outspoken critic of Vladimir Putin said his ability to enter the US has been revoked after Russia placed him on an international police wanted list. Bill Browder, a hedge fund manager and activist, said he was informed his so-called Global Entry status had been suspended and that he was unable to check in for a flight to the US, after Russia had him added to the Interpol arrest list. Mr Browder, 53, who pushed for the US to enforce a powerful set of sanctions against figures close to the Kremlin, said Russia had tried on four previous occasions to have him placed on the Interpol Red List.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:52:35 -0400)


The deputy head of the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas vowed to keep close ties with Israel's arch-enemy Iran and to maintain its weapons, Iranian media reported on Sunday, rejecting Israeli preconditions for any peace talks. Hamas, which is designated as a terrorist group by Western countries and Israel, signed a reconciliation deal this month with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's Fatah faction. "Undoubtedly, the Palestinian resistance forces will never give up ... their arms," the semi-official news agency Mehr quoted Saleh Arouri as saying at a meeting with the Iranian parliament's speaker Ali Larijani in Tehran.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 22:08:56 -0400)


TONIGHT - @SenJohnMcCain talks about the Vietnam War's legacy on C-SPAN, at 6 & 10pm ET. pic.twitter.com/WnZT0n8Mcn—


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 09:26:00 -0400)


Smart skins with distributed electronics means that instead of having systems mounted on the aircraft, you would have apertures integrated on the skin of the aircraft, analysts have said. Some of these characteristics may have been on display earlier this year when Northrop Grumman's SuperBowl AD revealed a flashy first look at its rendering of a new 6th-generation fighter jet. The new aircraft, engineered to succeed the 5th-generation F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and explode onto the scene by the mid 2030s, is now in the earliest stages of conceptual development with the Air Force and Navy.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:22:40 -0400)


Suspect Ashley McArthur once worked at the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office in Florida.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:51:44 -0400)


Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank has invested $15 million in a local job training program as part of a deal to build Atlanta’s new football stadium in Westside Atlanta, one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 13:40:48 -0400)


“Look, I’ve called many people. And I would think that every one of them appreciated it,” Trump told Maria Bartiromo in an interview on Fox News on Sunday.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:41:49 -0400)


Chinese president Xi Jinping declared an era of national rejuvenation in a speech that garnered 1.5 billion virtual claps on a virtual applause app released in conjunction with the Communist Party congress.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:14:24 -0400)


A string of murders in Florida is sparking fears that a serial killer is targeting Tampa residents.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 17:04:07 -0400)


First lady Melania Trump gave a group of students a special treat on Monday during her surprise visit to a Michigan middle school.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:58:35 -0400)


Indonesia's government is seeking clarification from the U.S. after the Indonesian military chief was denied entry to the country, an official said Sunday.


(Tue, 24 Oct 2017 00:02:48 -0400)


Bill O’Reilly says he’s made at God over the sexual harassment allegations that drove him off the air at Fox News earlier this year.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 14:05:43 -0400)


Conjoined twins born in Gaza Sunday need to leave the blockaded Palestinian enclave for treatment crucial to their survival, their doctor and a family member said. "A woman gave birth this morning to Siamese twins joined at the stomach and pelvis," Allam Abu Hamda, head of the neonatal unit at Gaza's Shifa Hospital, told AFP. The twins, whose condition Abu Hamda said was stable, have one shared leg, but separate hearts and lungs.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 21:14:50 -0400)


It's a situation no ocean swimmer wants to find themselves in. John Craig was free diving off the coast of Shark Bay in Western Australia on Friday afternoon, when he suddenly found himself alone — and stalked by a tiger shark. SEE ALSO: In Australia, sometimes you've got to pick a shark out of a pool Craig and a friend of his were at the last dive spot of the day, where a series of unfortunate events began, according to his Facebook post.  On his first shot spearfishing, he had managed to get his spear stuck in a rock. Meanwhile, his friend was on the boat, which was having mechanical trouble. By the point Craig managed to get his spear free, the boat had drifted away. He was alone. "I started to call out and splash to try and get the attention of my friend but after five minutes it was clear I was on my own ... I had been splashing and screaming for some time and my heart rate was sky high," he wrote in the post. Craig then dived underwater to check that he was in the same place as marked on the GPS, when he noticed a four-metre-long tiger shark approaching and circling beneath him.  "It was obvious the sharks had been attracted by my splashing and panicking so I knew immediately that I had to try to calm down in order to survive," he said. After recognising the shark was trying to size him up, Craig decided to make a beeline for the shore. It wasn't going to be an easy swim, he was 7.4 kilometres (4.6 miles) out to sea. Then, the shark followed him. "I have to admit that at this point I thought I was gone," he said. Fortunately, the shark swimming along with him gave up after about 500 metres in, and left him alone.  Craig kept swimming for about three hours before he noticed boats and a plane searching for him. He screamed and waved at them — but his wetsuit was in camouflage, making it difficult for rescuers to find him. He made it to shore, exhausted from the swim and barely able to walk. The rescue boats and plane were too far for him to signal. Half an hour later, a plane came along the coast and circled to show that it had seen him. He was picked up by a fisheries boat, and reunited with his wife. "I feel extremely lucky to be alive and was blown away by the Shark Bay community's efforts to rescue me," he added. "I am eternally grateful and I'm sure I'll be buying beers for years to come."  Despite the frightening experience, Craig doesn't want to discourage people from diving around Shark Bay. "We need them in the oceans and as much as it was scary at the time I can only reflect on how beautiful that big female tiger shark was. If the circumstances were different I would have been stoked to have that experience," he said. WATCH: Someone created a storm lamp that produces lightning every time Trump tweets


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:52:27 -0400)


In a tradition that may go back centuries, older students at St Andrews spend a weekend showing new kids around, after which the younger students demonstrate their gratitude with a gift. It used to be raisins, but not now.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:46:27 -0400)


In an interview with “Good Morning America” Monday morning, Myeshia Johnson recounted her condolence call from the president last week, saying Trump struggled to recall her husband’s name. The president soon took to Twitter to disagree.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:43:20 -0400)


Every year, New Yorkers and their beloved canine pals embark on a time-honored tradition: The Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 20:35:36 -0400)


A woman and her two children have been arrested in Long Island in connection to seven armed robberies, all of which took place over the last month.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:24:52 -0400)


All five living former U.S. presidents gathered at a hurricane relief concert in Texas to raise money for victims of Hurricane Harvey, Irma, and Maria on Saturday night -- and the Internet can't stop obsessing about one moment between George W. Bush and Barack Obama.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 19:25:11 -0400)


The Carrera T is yet another 911 variant, but this is now the lightest 911 you can buy.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:58:21 -0400)


A prominent journalist at Russia’s top independent radio station was stabbed in the neck on Monday after a spate of recent attacks and threats against Russian media.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 01:08:19 -0400)


The families of a young couple found dead in an embrace believe they died in a murder-suicide motivated by compassion.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 07:52:14 -0400)


The ethics watchdog for Norway's $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund is reviewing allegations that U.S. pipeline operator Energy Transfer Partners may breach the fund's investment guidelines. Under rules set by Norway's parliament, any firm the fund invests in must meet guidelines related to the environment, human rights, governance and other issues. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe has said it could contaminate the Missouri River and said it threatens their sacred sites.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:31:47 -0400)


It affects more than 30 products


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 18:07:02 -0400)


Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell still trusts Donald Trump, despite the president’s attacks on him and the rest of the GOP, McConnell told CNN Sunday on "State of the Union."


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 21:20:09 -0400)


On the heels of devastating wildfires that killed more than 40 people in Northern California earlier this month, Southern California is now on high alert for fire danger.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 09:57:52 -0400)


A British man has been sentenced to three months in prison in Dubai for touching a man's hip in a bar, according to campaigners. Jamie Harron, from Stirling, was arrested in July over the incident in which he said he put his hand on a man's hip to avoid spilling a drink in a crowded bar. The 27-year-old electrician had been working in Afghanistan and was on a two-day stopover in the United Arab Emirates at the time. After his arrest for public indecency he lost his job and was told he could have faced up to three years in jail. Campaign group Detained in Dubai (DiD) said he was sentenced to three months imprisonment at court on Sunday but lawyers plan to appeal. The group said Mr Harron is "angry, disappointed, and dreads what may happen next". He is not currently in custody while the appeal is considered, DiD chief executive Radha Stirling said. Mr Harron has already been sentenced in absentia to 30 days in prison for failing to appear at a court hearing for making a rude gesture and drinking alcohol during the same July incident. Unusual laws that tourists should be wary of DiD said the 27-year-old was not told about the court date in advance and that sentence is also being appealed against. In relation to the alleged public indecency charge, Mr Harron is said to have been holding a drink, moving through a crowded bar and held a hand in front of him to avoid spilling it on himself or others. He then "touched a man on his hip to avoid impact". He was initially jailed for five days and then released on bail with his passport confiscated. Ms Stirling said: "Now Jamie has been sentenced to three months; there is no telling whether a judgement on appeal will be better or worse. "He has already suffered tremendously as a result of these allegations, and now faces the likelihood of incarceration. "His family was unable to visit him during this critical time because they faced a very real risk of imprisonment themselves under the UAE's cyber crime laws which forbid criticism of the government. "At this point, Jamie will definitely be pursuing civil action against his accusers when he does eventually return home, as it appears that he will not be able to find justice in the UAE." She added: "He feels betrayed and exploited by the system, which did not investigate the reports of key witnesses in his defence and led him to believe that the case would be dropped." A spokeswoman for the Foreign Office said: "We have been in contact with a British man following his arrest in Dubai in July. We are providing consular assistance."


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:00:22 -0400)


When Haider al-Abadi was tasked with forming a new Iraqi government in August 2014, just weeks after a lightning offensive by the Islamic State group, many believed he would fail. Three years later, the stocky prime minister with a close-cut white beard has transformed what many in Iraq considered "mission impossible" into a success story. "The standard view of Abadi was that he was indecisive, weak and bit too conciliatory for Iraqi politics," says Fanar Haddad, a research fellow at the Middle East Institute of the National University of Singapore.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 13:17:26 -0400)


ABC News' Chief Global Correspondent Martha Raddatz travelled to the USS Reagan for an exclusive look at U.S. military preparations near North Korea.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 12:55:47 -0400)


The dramatic weight loss of a severely chunky golden retriever mix could be an inspiration to people caring for overweight pets.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:23:46 -0400)


A 13-year-old boy fatally shot a 10-year-old friend with a crossbow and wounded the victim’s younger brother as the boys played in a neighborhood treehouse in Oklahoma on Saturday evening, law enforcement officials said.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 17:10:48 -0400)


By Dan Whitcomb LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Firearms-related deaths and injuries increased 70 percent in parts of California in the weeks after gun shows in neighboring Nevada, which has fewer regulations on such events, a University of California, Berkeley study released on Monday found. The research could help prevent gun deaths by charting a pattern between where weapons are purchased at gun shows and where shootings take place, according to the authors. The study, which was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health, examined firearm injury rates before and after California and Nevada gun shows between 2005 and 2013 in areas of California near the shows.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:23:07 -0400)



(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 17:09:24 -0400)


The congresswoman hit back at the White House chief of staff on Sunday.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 15:44:03 -0400)


Police are looking for the public's help to identify a young boy whose lifeless body washed ashore on a beach in Galveston, Texas, on Friday evening.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 02:32:55 -0400)


blasted Steve Bannon in an interview on “Fox News Sunday,” saying the former White House chief strategist backs losing Republican candidates who are dividing and hurting the party.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:28:16 -0400)


Catalan separatists Monday threatened "mass civil disobedience" if Madrid carries out threats to depose their leaders, as tensions mounted over a bid to sever the region from Spain. Madrid stood firm on its plans to replace the government of the semi-autonomous region whose inhabitants voted "Yes" in a banned independence referendum on October 1. Catalonia's separatist parties, in turn, called a special session of the regional parliament for Thursday to devise a response.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:24:00 -0400)


Wearing a white T-shirt emblazoned with swastikas, Randy Furniss, hands in his pockets, walked slowly through a crowd Thursday that had largely gathered to protest white nationalist Richard Spencer, who was delivering a speech at the University of Florida. Days before Florida Gov. Rick Scott, R, had warned in an executive order that a "threat of a potential emergency is imminent" in Alachua County, where the University of Florida is located, noting that prior speaking engagements involving Spencer have sparked protest and violence. The event was Spencer's first public speech on a college campus since he led hundreds of torch-bearing white supremacists, white nationalists and others through the University of Virginia in a far-right rally in August that preceded a weekend of violent protests in Charlottesville.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 18:50:22 -0400)


Some Northern Californians who feared the worst for their pets in the wake of this month’s deadly wildfires are getting some welcome good news in recent days: Their animals survived.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:44:10 -0400)


Bill O’Reilly says the recent New York Times report that he settled a sexual harassment suit for $32 million shortly before Fox News offered him a $100 million contract extension is “false, defamatory” and “another smear article.”


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 09:26:00 -0400)


Smart skins with distributed electronics means that instead of having systems mounted on the aircraft, you would have apertures integrated on the skin of the aircraft, analysts have said. Some of these characteristics may have been on display earlier this year when Northrop Grumman's SuperBowl AD revealed a flashy first look at its rendering of a new 6th-generation fighter jet. The new aircraft, engineered to succeed the 5th-generation F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and explode onto the scene by the mid 2030s, is now in the earliest stages of conceptual development with the Air Force and Navy.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:06:08 -0400)


Take a careful look at the image of two brains on this page. The picture is of the brains of two three-year-old children. It’s obvious that the brain on the left is much bigger than the one on the right. The image on the left also has fewer spots, and far fewer dark “fuzzy” areas. To neurologists who study the brain, and who have worked out how to interpret the images, the difference between these two brains is both remarkable and shocking. The brain on the right lacks some of the most fundamental areas present in the image on the left. Those deficits make it impossible for that child to develop capacities that the child on the left will have: the child on the right will grow into an adult who is less intelligent, less able to empathise with others, more likely to become addicted to drugs and involved in violent crime than the child on the left. The child on the right is much more likely to be unemployed and to be dependent on welfare, and to develop mental and other serious health problems. What could possibly cause so radical a divergence in brain development? The obvious answer is that it must have been some illness or terrible accident. The obvious answer is wrong. he primary cause of the extraordinary difference between the brains of these two three-year-old children is the way they were treated by their mothers. The child with the much more fully developed brain was cherished by its mother, who was constantly and fully responsive to her baby. The child with the shrivelled brain was neglected and abused. That difference in treatment explains why one child’s brain develops fully, and the other’s does not. Neurologists are beginning to understand exactly how a baby’s interaction with their mother determines how, and indeed whether, the brain grows in the way that it should. Professor Allan Schore, of UCLA, who has surveyed the scientific literature and has made significant contributions to it, stresses that the growth of brain cells is a “consequence of an infant’s interaction with the main caregiver [usually the mother]”. The growth of the baby’s brain “literally requires positive interaction between mother and infant. The development of cerebral circuits depends on it.” Prof Schore points out that if a baby is not treated properly in the first two years of life, the genes for various aspects of brain function, including intelligence, cannot operate, and may not even come into existence. Nature and nurture cannot be disentangled: the genes a baby has will be profoundly affected by the way it is treated. The details of how the chemical reactions that are essential to the formation of new brain cells and the connections between them are affected by the way a mother interacts with her baby are extremely technical. Suffice it to say that there is now a very substantial body of evidence that shows that the way a baby is treated in the first two years determines whether or not the resulting adult has a fully functioning brain. The damage caused by neglect and other forms of abuse comes by degrees: the more severe the neglect, the greater the damage. Eighty per cent of brain cells that a person will ever have are manufactured during the first two years after birth. If the process of building brain cells and connections between them goes wrong, the deficits are permanent. This discovery has enormous implications for social policy. It explains two very persistent features of our society. One is the way that chronic disadvantage reproduces itself across generations of the same families. There is a cycle of deprivation – lack of educational attainment, persistent unemployment, poverty, addiction, crime – which, once a family is in it, has proved almost impossible to break. The way that the development of a child’s brain is dependent on the way that the child is treated by its mother explains why this depressing cycle happens. Parents who, because their parents neglected them, do not have fully developed brains, neglect their own children in a similar way: their own children’s brains suffer from the same lack of development that blighted their own lives. They, too, are likely to fail at school, to be liable to get addicted to drugs, to be unable to hold down a job, and to have a propensity to violence. The second persistent feature is the dismal failure of rehabilitation programmes that aim to diminish the rate at which persistent young offenders commit crimes. Many different approaches have been tried, from intensive supervision to taking young offenders on safaris, but none has worked reliably or effectively. Recent research indicates that a large majority – perhaps more than three quarters – of persistent young offenders have brains that have not developed properly. They have, that is, suffered from neglect in the first two years of life, which prevented their brains from growing. As a consequence, they may be incapable of responding to the same incentives and punishments that will steer those with more fully developed brains away from crime. That result may lead you to conclude that nothing can be done about the social problems that result from childhood neglect. But that would be wrong. There is a way to break the cycle, and it is not terribly difficult to achieve. It consists in intervening early and showing mothers who neglect their children how to treat them in a way which will lead their babies’ brains to develop fully. “Early intervention”, as the policy is called, has been tried in parts of the US for more than 15 years. It consists in ensuring that mothers identified as “at risk” of neglecting their babies are given regular visits (at least once every week) by a nurse who instructs them on how to care for the newborn child. Data from the city of Elmira in New York State, where such programmes have been in place longest, show that children whose mothers had received those visits did much better than children from a comparable background whose mothers were not part of the programme: they had, for instance, 50 per cent fewer arrests, 80 per cent fewer convictions, and a significantly lower rate of drug abuse. Graham Allen, the Labour MP for Nottingham North, has been a fervent advocate of introducing early intervention programmes into the UK since at least 2008. That year, he collaborated with Iain Duncan Smith, now Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, on Early Intervention: Good Parents, Great Kids, Better Citizens, a report for the Centre for Social Justice which set out evidence that the neglect of children in the first two years of life damages the development of their brains. The report also looked at the social problems that resulted, and examined the effects that early intervention could have in helping to solve those problems. Mr Allen’s own constituency is one of the most deprived in England: it has the highest rates of teenage pregnancy in Europe, and one of the lowest rates of participation in higher education. “There is no doubt that early intervention can make a tremendous contribution to improving our society,” Mr Allen says. “Not the least benefit is the financial one. The amount it saves taxpayers, by reducing benefits, by cutting care home places for kids who would otherwise have to be taken from their parents, by reducing prison places, and so on, is staggering.” Andrea Leadsom, the Conservative MP for South Northamptonshire, agrees. She is a passionate advocate of early intervention programmes. “I know they work because I have seen them in operation”, she says. “I helped to run an early intervention centre in Oxford, one of the first early intervention programmes in England. I have helped to institute such programmes in Northamptonshire. I can bear witness to the astonishing benefits. "The biggest problem at the moment is that the programmes are far too small. In Oxford, the centre sees perhaps 300 babies a year. But there are 17,000 babies born in Oxford every year, which means there are 34,000 babies in Oxford in the first two years of life who might benefit from the programme. "We need central Government to get behind early intervention so that it happens on a big enough scale everywhere.” Frank Field, the Labour MP for Birkenhead, is another passionate advocate of early intervention. He has also introduced small-scale schemes in his own constituency, and is working hard to find ways to get such schemes adopted more widely. There is a remarkable cross-party consensus that early intervention is a vitally important policy which needs to be supported nationally. Both David Cameron and Ed Miliband have endorsed early intervention, and insisted that it should be implemented. But nothing is happening to make sure that it is. “Quite the opposite,” notes Mr Allen. “The funding I thought was earmarked for it is being taken away. The plans that I have put forward are being hollowed out.” “It’s crazy,” adds Mrs Leadsom. “This is a policy that has the potential to transform our society, to mean that the next generation of babies will grow into more responsible, less crime-prone, and better educated adults. "We know what needs to be done to get those results: we need to ensure that mothers who are at risk of neglecting or abusing their babies in the first two years of life are instructed how to care for them and interact with them properly. But no one in central government is pushing it. In fact, they’re taking away the early intervention grant in order to pay for the pupil premium for two-year-olds.” Frank Field is just as depressed about the prospects of getting early intervention adopted by the Government. “The Prime Minister asked me to write a report on early intervention,” he says. “My hopes were up when I delivered it several weeks ago. But as far as I can tell, he hasn’t even read it.” What explains the failure to adopt early intervention programmes nationally? The greatest obstacle may simply be that the biggest benefits will not be obvious for 15 years. The babies who benefit from early intervention today will take more than a decade to grow into teenagers who do not commit the crimes they would have perpetrated had their mothers not been helped by an early intervention programme. Elections, however, are every five years. That means the benefits will not accrue to the politicians in power now, but to their successors – which could be why those in power now are reluctant to expend effort and money on early intervention programmes. “I hope that isn’t true,” says Graham Allen. “Because if it is, it would mean we are politically incapable of implementing the one policy that will certainly make our society immeasurably better. And what more profound condemnation of our political system could there be than that?”


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 20:22:01 -0400)


(Reuters) - The trial of a Mexican man accused of murdering a woman while illegally in the United States began in San Francisco on Monday, a case that President Donald Trump has cited as an example of the dangers posed by lax border security. Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, also known as Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, has said he shot Kate Steinle by accident on a pier in the California city on July 1, 2015. "He did not know the object in his hand was a gun," Matt Gonzalez, an attorney for the defendant, was quoted as saying by NBC Bay Area before he headed into the courtroom.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:01:17 -0400)


The female spy used a fake identity to get a job with a major Democratic donor and posed as an accountant.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:00:26 -0400)


confirmed he’ll run for re-election next year as an independent candidate.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 15:23:52 -0400)


Germany on Monday signed a deal to sell three submarines to the Israeli navy in an agreement of "strategic importance" to the Jewish state, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said. Netanyahu "welcomed the signing of a memorandum of understanding between Germany and the state of Israel to acquire the submarines," his office said in a Hebrew-language statement.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:51:53 -0400)


Another month, another onslaught of new additions -- and titles being taken away -- on Netflix.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:00:48 -0400)


Procrastinating husband, wives, boyfriends and girlfriends: fear not!


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:01:01 -0400)


Authorities believe they have found the body of a missing 3-year-old Texas girl who vanished three weeks ago, allegedly after her father left her outside at night as punishment.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:14:16 -0400)


Police are working to identify a young boy whose lifeless body was found Friday evening after washing ashore on a quiet stretch of beach in Galveston, Texas


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 04:49:00 -0400)


The United States is preparing to put nuclear bomber planes on 24-hour alert for the first time since the Cold War, a senior Air Force official has said. A fleet of B-52s laden with nuclear weapons could soon be readied to launch within a day's notice amid growing tensions with North Korea. General David Goldfein, Air Force Chief of Staff, said US military leaders were being forced to adapt to "the reality of the global situation we find ourselves in".


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:51:44 -0400)


Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank has invested $15 million in a local job training program as part of a deal to build Atlanta’s new football stadium in Westside Atlanta, one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods.


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 04:45:48 -0400)


The Japanese prime minister bonded with Trump over reining in North Korea


(Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:16:10 -0400)


Talk about a bum note: A Montreal man says he’s facing a $117 traffic ticket just for singing in his car.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:52:35 -0400)


The deputy head of the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas vowed to keep close ties with Israel's arch-enemy Iran and to maintain its weapons, Iranian media reported on Sunday, rejecting Israeli preconditions for any peace talks. Hamas, which is designated as a terrorist group by Western countries and Israel, signed a reconciliation deal this month with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's Fatah faction. "Undoubtedly, the Palestinian resistance forces will never give up ... their arms," the semi-official news agency Mehr quoted Saleh Arouri as saying at a meeting with the Iranian parliament's speaker Ali Larijani in Tehran.


(Sun, 22 Oct 2017 10:58:27 -0400)


British Isil fighters should be killed in Syria rather than be allowed to return to UK, a Government minister has said. Rory Stewart said converts who leave Britain to fight for the terror group are guilty of horrific acts and the only way of dealing with them is to kill them "in almost every case". His remarks come just days after the independent reviewer of terrorism legislation Max Hill QC said young people who travelled to Syria after being "brainwashed" should be allowed to come home and rejoin society.  Mr Hill told the BBC that it was not worth losing a generation of young people who "naively" went to join Isil before attempting to come back to the UK.  Asked by BBC Radio 5 Live's John Pienaar if they had "brought on themselves what they are about to get?", he said: "These are people who have essentially moved away from any kind of allegiance towards the British Government. A female sniper of the Syrian Democratic Forces Credit: AFP "They are absolutely dedicated, as members of the Islamic State, towards the creation of a caliphate, they believe in an extremely hateful doctrine which involves killing themselves, killing others and trying to use violence and brutality to create an eighth century, or seventh century, state. "So I'm afraid we have to be serious about the fact these people are a serious danger to us, and unfortunately the only way of dealing with them will be, in almost every case, to kill them." Around half of the estimated 850 Britons believed to have gone to join the extremists are now believed to be back in the UK. There are fears more will follow as the terror organisation loses territory in Iraq and Syria.  Mr Stewart's comments come after the defence secretary Michael Fallon said earlier this month that anyone who chooses to leave the UK to fight for the Islamic State runs the risk of being killed.  Mr Fallon said: “If you are a British national in Iraq or Syria and if you have chosen to fight for [Isis] – an illegal organisation that is preparing and inspiring terror attacks on our streets – then you have made yourself a legitimate target and you run the risk every hour of every day of being on the wrong end of an RAF or a United States missile.” FAQ | Islamic State Mr Hill, who called for former Isil fighters to be allowed to reintegrate back into the UK, was supported by Conservative MP Andrew Rosindell, who sits on the Commons foreign affairs committee. He said: "The presumption should be that all people who went to join IS should be dealt with by the criminal justice system unless there is a good reason why not. "IS is an utterly barbaric organisation still intent on carrying out terror attacks in Britain and everything possible must be done to stop its supporters being involved in such atrocities." But Mr Stewart said converts to the terror group believed in an "extremely hateful doctrine", saying fighters can expect to be killed given the threat they pose to British security. Hundreds of British citizens are known to have travelled to Syria to fight with Islamist groups during the course of the six-year conflict. Brett McGurk, a top US envoy for the coalition fighting Islamic State (IS), has said his mission is to ensure every foreign IS fighter in Syria dies in Syria. Seven foiled UK terror plots Mr Stewart was asked about claims made by Mr McGurk that foreign fighters do not make it back to their country of origin and die in Raqqa or wherever they are serving. Coalition forces are reported to have given a list of names and photos to Kurdish fighters on the ground so that they can identify and kill foreign fighters before they have the chance to escape as they are seen as a security threat. However this could allow room for some fighters, identify as less serious offenders, to be allowed to return home. Mr Stewart, a former diplomat, went on to say: "These are people who are executing people in the back of their heads, who have held women and children hostage, who are torturing and murdering trying by violence to impose their will. "Our response has to be, when somebody does that, I'm afraid, to deal with that." Mr Stewart also said British authorities had made it "very clear" that people should not be volunteering with militia groups to fight IS. "If you wish to serve your country and you wish to fight terrorism, then please apply to join the military or join the police or join our intelligence services, we'll train you, we'll work with you to do it in a legal and controlled fashion," he said. Mr Stewart confirmed it remained British policy to remove Syrian president Bashar Assad. "I don't think anyone should be in any doubt that the control that he has is brutal and ultimately fragile," he said. "The policy of the British Government is that Bashar al-Assad needs to step aside and we need transition to a new government, because so long as that man is in power it is going to be impossible to have a long-term, stable, sustainable future for Syria."


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